Like every other parent we know, we’re sure you’ve spent the past month adjusting to the reality of working, living, and caring for kids all under one roof. 

If you’ve got curious kids on your hands, you’ve probably been getting loads of questions like “what is coronavirus?” and “how does it spread?”. Like all of us, you look to Google for answers to those questions, as we learn more about this new virus each day. 

But, what do you say when your kids ask “mom, how can I help?” or “dad, how can I make things better?” We think one of the most important things you can do right now is to raise awareness with your kids about the doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers fighting on the frontlines everyday to keep us safe. 

Here are some ways you can talk to your kids about this:

Make DIY face masks for the entire family

Getting your kids excited about designing their own face masks is a great way to ensure they wear one whenever they go outside, and a great time to remind them why we are staying home and healthcare workers are not. It’s also a fun project that allows them to show their personality and keeps them occupied for hours (a win-win if you ask us!). 

Teach your kids about the human body

It’s never been a better time to get your kids interested in science. Legends of Learning has an entire curriculum about the human body, including how viruses work. Let your kids work through that curriculum as they play Awakening, and that might help you get some of their tougher science questions answered. We’ve even updated Awakening so that your kids can dress up their avatar as a first responder Healthcare Hero – complete with a bad, at-home haircut from mom!

Write letters to healthcare workers 

Are there any healthcare workers in your family or circle of friends? Now would be a great time to ask your kids to write an uplifting letter to that person. It may seem like a small gesture, but our healthcare workers need all the bright spots they can find!

Take part in the 7pm collective cheer

It’s become a tradition in cities like New York for everyone to stop what they’re doing at 7pm each night and participate in a collective cheer for our healthcare workers. For a couple of minutes each night, people come outside on their porches or balconies and make noise to celebrate all the first responders out there. Many doctors and nurses have claimed this has helped them stay positive and keep going. Even if you’re quarantined in your home, this is a great way to keep your kids engaged and thinking about our first responders. Each night at 7pm, encourage your entire family to stop and cheer or dance for a minute.